Chapter 3 Kaku-Kawari (Bishop Exchange Opening)

Section 1 Haya-guri Gin(rushing Silver)
Tip: You have to have nerve to give battle with your King on the original position.

White in hand: B 
  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
+---------------------------+
|wL wN wS wG wK  *  * wN wL |a
| * wR  *  *  *  * wG  *  * |b
|wP  * wP wP wP wP wS wP wP |c
| *  *  *  *  *  * wP  *  * |d
| * wP  *  *  *  *  * bP  * |e
| *  * bP  *  *  *  *  *  * |f
|bP bP bS bP bP bP bP  * bP |g
| *  * bG  *  *  * bS bR  * |h
|bL bN  *  * bK bG  * bN bL |i
+---------------------------+
Black in hand: B 
Diagram 1. Up to S-3h.
After Diagram 1, you'll have to see whether White plays S-6b or S-7b before deciding your next move. If White plays S-6b, his bo-gin (climbing silver) is eliminated, so you can play K-6h. If you do the same at (w) S-7b, White will then play S-8c, thereby taking the due course for the bo-gin. If you are thinking of assuming the hayaguri-gin (rushing Silver) tactic, your move should be P-1f. At White's P-7d, you play P-3f, the first step for the hayaguri-gin. If White plays P-6d instead, you can play S-2g aiming to resort to the bo-gin.

Just as the S-7b positioning has become more popular than S-6b, due to the widely supported tactics such as the Tsukata Special and the Hinieri-bisha (twisting Rook), so is S-7b usually played in Kaku-kawari openings. The reason: White wants to keep the possibility of the bo-gin as long as possible. This is how Black's K-6h has been practically wiped out. In this section we will look into the position after Black's P-1f. As for White's options, there are two types to play: P-9d and K-4b, both of which I am going to explain in detail. It would be impossible, however, for me to cover all the variations here, so I will just refer to a few major ones.

White in hand: B 
  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
+---------------------------+
|wL wN  * wG  *  *  * wN wL |a
| * wR  *  *  * wK wG  *  * |b
|wP  *  * wP wP wP wS wP wP |c
| *  * wP wS  *  * wP  *  * |d
| * wP  *  *  *  *  * bP  * |e
| *  * bP  *  * bS bP  * bP |f
|bP bP bS bP bP bP  *  *  * |g
| *  * bG  *  *  *  * bR  * |h
|bL bN  *  * bK bG  * bN bL |i
+---------------------------+
Black in hand: B 
Diagram 2. Up to S-6d.
Look at Diagram 2, which shows a basic position. First, some examples:

Moves After Diagram 2:
P-3e Px3e, Sx3e --->(Diagram 3)

You aim for an exchange of Silvers, which is similar in principle to the bo-gin, but with the Hayaguri-gin, you have your Pawn on 3f, which needs due consideration. You see, if you play the routine: P-2d, Px2d, Sx2d, you will only send your opponent on his way to euphoria by Sx2d, Rx2d, B*1e! So you have to play P-1f or K-6h to avoid a fork on R&K. Now you see why S-7b and P-1f have become joseki?

To sum it up, you decide where to place your Silver after seeing your opponent's move: a) if it is koshikake-gin(reclining Silver, or S on 5e), you play bo-gin. b) if bo-gin or hayaguri-gin, then you play hayaguri-gin.

White in hand: B P 
  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
+---------------------------+
|wL wN  * wG  *  *  * wN wL |a
| * wR  *  *  * wK wG  *  * |b
|wP  *  * wP wP wP wS wP wP |c
| *  * wP wS  *  *  *  *  * |d
| * wP  *  *  *  * bS bP  * |e
| *  * bP  *  *  *  *  * bP |f
|bP bP bS bP bP bP  *  *  * |g
| *  * bG  *  *  *  * bR  * |h
|bL bN  *  * bK bG  * bN bL |i
+---------------------------+
Black in hand: B P 
Diagram 3. Up to Sx3e.
At Sx3e, it's White's turn to make a difficult decision.

Further Moves:
P-8f Px8f P*8e

Sequential Pawn drops┼ijoining Pawn tesuji┼jlooks like a promising technique for White. If Black responds with Px8e, Rx8e will make a crossroads Rook threatening Rx4e and Rx8I+.

Further Moves:
4.P-2d Px2d 5.Sx2d Sx2d 6.Rx2d P*2c 7.R-2h Px8f 8.P*8d Rx8d 9.B*6f B*5e 10.P*3c!! --->(Doagram 4)

Please remember that P*8c instead of P*8d will cause a shortage of Pawns later. To Black's P*8d, White could play P8g+, then Rx8d, which will quiet down the position, but if he simply plays Rx8d, the devastating position (Diagram 4) awaits.

White in hand: S P2 
  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
+---------------------------+
|wL wN  * wG  *  *  * wN wL |a
| *  *  *  *  * wK wG  *  * |b
|wP  *  * wP wP wP bP wP wP |c
| * wR wP wS  *  *  *  *  * |d
| *  *  *  * wB  *  *  *  * |e
| * wP bP bB  *  *  *  * bP |f
|bP  * bS bP bP bP  *  *  * |g
| *  * bG  *  *  *  * bR  * |h
|bL bN  *  * bK bG  * bN bL |i
+---------------------------+
Black in hand: S P 
Diagram 4. Up to P*3c.
If White had played R-8b (instead of B*5d) at Black's B*6f, you could have captured a Rook by:

Bx1a+, P-8g+, Gx8g, Rx8g+, L*8h

Back to the moves cited, P*3c is the crucial move. If White responds with Kx3c, you'll only have to play R-3h, which practically marks the end. What if White then plays P*3g? You can play Rx3g, can you not?

This move, P*3c was based on what Naito played in his game against Yonenaga, which was said to be one of the most beautiful Kaku-kawari games ever played. The moves I just presented here were slightly different from those they played, with the Pawns along the far ends a little different, but the idea is from nobody else but Naito.

Pulling White's Silver on 2b from 3c was another possibility which was investigated by many players. In the meantime K-4b became less popular, because the King seems too close to the danger zone. So the mainstream position was that of pushing Pawns on the far ends: P-1f(b) and P-9d(w), with both Kings in the original squares. In that case, please note, there is an effective line of moves on White's part. The Shima-Habu game played in the Zen Nippon Open tournament (Jan. 16, 1991) will give you a clue.

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